What if everyone were a cyclist?

And what if everyone had an even probability of visiting some other fellow cyclist who lived between 3 and 8 kilometers away from them? This would be a beautiful and strange world. Here is what the traffic might look like in that world, assuming there were no effects of congestion. Thicker lines have more bikes:

map

Line thickness is scaled to the log of a measure of betweenness, based on optimal paths for bicycles, as defined according to current OSM data and OSRM‘s default bicycle routing profile. ‘People’ were located randomly inside their 2010 home census block and routes were calculated between random pairs of people where the straight-line distance between them was between 3 and 8 kilometers. The distance limits are to simulate reasonable cycling trips and work against MAUP effects.

This is the first step in a project to develop mode-specific street hierarchies, which can be used in transport maps where auto-based classification schemes are undesireable or unavailable. In the coming days, I’ll work on a better weighting scheme (than population density) and look at other modes and cities. I’ll be working the results into a poster for NACIS 2017, showing the different hierarchical classifications that result for cycling, walking, and driving modes, hopefully across three cities with widely different development patterns (Cincinnati, Toronto, …?)

More to come soon!

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Posted in: Design | Maps | Silly Bullshit
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Rethinking the Urban Bike Map

Gosh. I’m going to do one of those academic blog posts where I self-promote by telling you that I’ve just published a paper and that you should go read it. I hate those. But, I had actually been meaning to make my thoughts into a blog post or two, and without the intervention of my academic advisor at the time, I would have; now the thing is a paper instead of a post, a full year after it would have been a post, and have I mentioned that you should read it? It’s about bike maps, and what I hate about bike maps and how I attempted to make them better as a genre, by example, and then by overly formal peer-reviewed explication.

The paper is in Cartographic Perspectives which is the journal of the very cool North American Cartographic Information Society who’s conference I attended last year. Cool people. Very friendly. If anyone out there is considering being a cartographer in North America, I recommend you do it, and not just for the conferences and open access journals.

P.S. Here is a link to the article PDF just in case the above link breaks when the issue gets published.

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Posted in: Bicycles | Maps | Psychological
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